June 29, 2020 9:45 pm
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Categories: JoshWho News Wayne Dupree

The SCOTUS issued a huge ruling today against George Soros.

They ruled that any organizations affiliated to the “Open Society” lose the protection of the #1A and can be treated as international threats.

This ruling impacts supporters in the US and abroad. 

MORE NEWS: Justice Clarance Thomas Slams Chief Justice Roberts in Scathing Statement

But what does all of this mean exactly?

Well, for starters, “Open Society” is the very foundation of everything “Soros.”

Here’s what Soros says about his “Open Society” foundation:

The Open Society Foundations were founded by George Soros, one of the world’s foremost philanthropists, who since 1984 has given away $32 billion of a personal fortune made in the financial markets.

Open Society has supported individuals and organizations across the globe fighting for freedom of expression, transparency, accountable government, and for societies that promote justice and equality. This giving has often focused on those who face discrimination purely for who they are, such as Europe’s Roma people, and others pushed to the margins of mainstream society.

This ruling centers around thee “AID v. Alliance for Open Society Intl,” case.

Here are the details of that case:

The case: The Alliance for Open Society International (AOSI) challenged a 2003 Congressional provision requiring U.S.-based organizations that receive federal funds to prevent HIV/AIDS overseas to adopt anti-prostitution and anti-sex trafficking policies. After litigation in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit, the U.S. Supreme Court held the provision violated the First Amendment. The government did not enforce the policy against U.S. organizations but continued to apply it to foreign affiliates. AOSI again challenged the provision. USAID petitioned SCOTUS for review, asking the court to determine whether, in light of its 2013 decision, the First Amendment prohibits enforcement of the provision for foreign entities affiliated with organizations like AOSI.

The issue: Whether—considering SCOTUS’ 2013 decision in Agency for International Development v. Alliance for Open Society International Inc., in which the court held the First Amendment bars enforcement of Congress’ policy requirement—the First Amendment further bars enforcement of that requirement with respect to legally distinct foreign entities operating overseas that are affiliated with U.S.-based organizations that receive federal funds to fight HIV/AIDS abroad.

The outcome: The court reversed the decision of the United States Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit in a 5-3 ruling, holding foreign affiliates of U.S.-based organizations that receive federal funds to fight HIV/AIDS abroad are not protected under the U.S. Constitution. Therefore, the policy requirement for foreign affiliates is constitutional.

In a simplistic (nonlawyer) nutshell: Soros wants U.S. federal funds for fighting AIDS to go to help prostitutes and the U.S. is saying “no, we have a rule that you must condemn prostitution abroad.” Soros says that’s against his 1A rights. SCOTUS says, in this case, he has no 1A rights.

SCOTUS reaffirms that “foreign citizens outside U. S. territory do not possess rights under the U. S. Constitution.”

Kinda fun that Kavanaugh was majority since Soros tried so hard to keep him off the bench.

It seems almost silly that we had to even go to court over this, right?

At any rate, it’s good news when any ruling goes against Soros…and he’s been fighting for this for a long time, so it’s gotta sting.

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